Mad Wednesday

  • 1950
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy

Far from Sturges's best, but intermittently hilarious. The film follows Harold Diddlebock, hero of Lloyd's classic silent THE FRESHMAN, into middle age. Harold is now a frumpy, office-bound bookkeeper with his glory days behind him. Fired from his job after two decades of toil, he goes on a drunken spree, and, in as unlikely a series of events as you'll...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on
Rating:

Far from Sturges's best, but intermittently hilarious. The film follows Harold Diddlebock, hero of Lloyd's classic silent THE FRESHMAN, into middle age. Harold is now a frumpy, office-bound bookkeeper with his glory days behind him. Fired from his job after two decades of toil, he goes on

a drunken spree, and, in as unlikely a series of events as you'll ever see, wakes up the owner of a moth-eaten and bankrupt circus. Eventually Lloyd winds up reprising the silent comedy scene from SAFETY LAST for which he is perhaps most famous--hanging from a tall building, this time with a huge

lion menacing him.

The idea of combining comic aces Lloyd and Sturges sounds highly promising, but both men's careers were on the wane, and the effort they make to milk laughs sometimes shows a bit too much. MAD WEDNESDAY was financed by, of all people, Howard Hughes, a man not usually known for his sense of humor.

It includes several excellent character bits by some of Hollywood's best second bananas: Kennedy (master of the slow burn), Stander (who left movies for years due to Red-baiting, then came back as a TV star), Hamilton (the ultimate witch), and Pangborn, who elevated prissiness to an art form. If

you can hang on through the long, dead scenes and wait for Lloyd to get going, you'll probably end up satisfied by at least some of the frantic slapstick which transpires. As with many films Hughes made, several versions of this film exist, the 89-minute version going under the title of THE SIN OF

HAROLD DIDDLEBOCK.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Far from Sturges's best, but intermittently hilarious. The film follows Harold Diddlebock, hero of Lloyd's classic silent THE FRESHMAN, into middle age. Harold is now a frumpy, office-bound bookkeeper with his glory days behind him. Fired from his job afte… (more)

Show More »