Louisa May Alcott's Little Men

  • 1998
  • Movie
  • PG
  • Children's, Drama

Children's filmmaking at its most sanctimonious, apparently designed to cash in on the success of the most recent version of Alcott's LITTLE WOMEN, right down to the casting of Chris Sarandon (he's the ex-husband of Susan Sarandon, who played Little Women's Marmee) as Professor Bhaer. The story follows headstrong Jo March (Mariel Hemingway), who's married...read more

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Reviewed by Maitland McDonagh
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Children's filmmaking at its most sanctimonious, apparently designed to cash in on the success of the most recent version of Alcott's LITTLE WOMEN, right down to the casting of Chris Sarandon (he's the ex-husband of Susan Sarandon, who played Little

Women's Marmee) as Professor Bhaer. The story follows headstrong Jo March (Mariel Hemingway), who's married to Bhaer and runs a progressive school for difficult children at their rustic home, Plumfield. Street urchin Nat (Michael Caloz), a talented violinist, is sent to them by her sister

Meg's husband John (Serge Houde), who rescued the boy from a scrape with the police. Nat is soon joined by his friend Dan (Ben Cook), an older lad hardened by his life on the streets. While Nat accepts the rules of the house and makes an effort to live up to the high standards set by Jo and her

husband, Dan clings to his rebellious ways, encouraging the other lads to fight, gamble, smoke, drink and swear. The messages are all commendable, but this picture is so dull and preachy that it's hard to imagine the average child watching long enough to absorb them. The film's production values

are attractive, the performances are professional -- though it's a bit tough to accept the hard-looking Hemingway as the warm, eternally optimistic Jo -- and the kids are cloyingly cute. The conspicuous exception is bad Dan, who's a singularly sullen and unappealing presence.

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  • Released: 1998
  • Rating: PG
  • Review: Children's filmmaking at its most sanctimonious, apparently designed to cash in on the success of the most recent version of Alcott's LITTLE WOMEN, right down to the casting of Chris Sarandon (he's the ex-husband of Susan Sarandon, who played Little Women… (more)

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