Lost And Found

  • 1979
  • Movie
  • PG
  • Comedy

Many of the same people came back from their success in A TOUCH OF CLASS to make this film, but it didn't come close to the original in wit, style, or box-office receipts. Executive producer Arnold Kopleson (formerly Johnny Carson's attorney and a renowned deal-maker in the film business) put together a team that looked good on paper but just doesn't seem...read more

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Many of the same people came back from their success in A TOUCH OF CLASS to make this film, but it didn't come close to the original in wit, style, or box-office receipts. Executive producer Arnold Kopleson (formerly Johnny Carson's attorney and a renowned deal-maker in the film business)

put together a team that looked good on paper but just doesn't seem to work on celluloid. Segal is a widowed English professor who meets Jackson, a divorced Englishwoman, at a French ski resort when they break each other's legs in an accident. They fall in love, decide to marry, and move back to

the US. The first few reels are funny, with Segal and Jackson having excellent material with which to work as they explore each other's personalities and agree to wed. Once in the States, Segal is eager to obtain tenure at the college, competing with Cunningham. The picture goes downhill as the

tension of "will they or won't they marry?" has already been relieved. The remainder of the movie is a series of slapstick scenes, including the obligatory drunken one where staid Jackson gets swacked at a conservative university party. Segal has played the Jewish boy being dominated by the mother

so many times (NO WAY TO TREAT A LADY; WHERE'S POPPA; etc.) that it's about time he retires that trophy. What's funny here is very good; what's bad isn't all that terrible. Look for SCTV types Candy and Short in small roles, before they became famous.

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  • Released: 1979
  • Rating: PG
  • Review: Many of the same people came back from their success in A TOUCH OF CLASS to make this film, but it didn't come close to the original in wit, style, or box-office receipts. Executive producer Arnold Kopleson (formerly Johnny Carson's attorney and a renowned… (more)

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