Looking For Kitty

Ostensibly a mystery about a missing woman, this thin, talky film is actually another unsatisfying exploration of masculine anomie written, directed by and starring Edward Burns. High-school baseball coach Abe Fiannico (David Krumholtz) is baffled by the disappearance of his beloved wife, Kitty (Ari Meyers), who vanished six months ago. He recently ran across...read more

Reviewed by Maitland McDonagh
Rating:

Ostensibly a mystery about a missing woman, this thin, talky film is actually another unsatisfying exploration of masculine anomie written, directed by and starring Edward Burns. High-school baseball coach Abe Fiannico (David Krumholtz) is baffled by the disappearance of his beloved wife, Kitty (Ari Meyers), who vanished six months ago. He recently ran across a gossip-column photo of her in a Manhattan bar with a group of scene makers, including has-been Brit-rocker Ron Stewart (Max Baker) — that's Ron, not Rod — so he's come to New York to find her. Private eye Jack Stanton (Burns), a depressed malcontent who quit the police force for private detective work after his wife's death, has a pretty good idea why Kitty decamped: Abe is enough to drive anyone crazy. He's always cold, has a hiatal hernia and a sensitive stomach — he doesn't drink coffee or eat "international foods" — and never stops talking about the kids on his baseball team. He's also been less than forthcoming about the circumstances of Kitty's "disappearance." Not only has Kitty left him before, but she didn't just go out one day and fail to come home: She packed a bag and left a note saying she "couldn't do this anymore." But Abe insists that Jack keep looking — if Kitty left of her own accord and doesn't want to come home, Abe wants to hear it from her. And so the odd couple rattles around Manhattan, Abe exiled to the car or sidewalk outside while Jack follows up on clues. Abe yammers about his team, the Lincoln Memorial High King Cobras; Jack seethes about Republicans and the ways in which New York has changed — all bad — since his great-grandfather refused to sell his 11th Avenue garage to make way for the Javits Center. Meanwhile, a conventioneer (Rachel Dratch) who loves Broadway plays flirts with Abe in the hotel bar, but he's too wrapped up in the quest for Kitty to respond. Jack's meddling super, KK (Kevin Kash), encourages him to get acquainted with pretty neighbor Marcie (Connie Britton), but he's too busy wallowing in self-pity. Made two years before THE GROOMSMEN (2006) but released after, this gloomy little picture is a collection of quirky conceits — from Jack's rude refusal to remember names to the incongruously sprightly, ukulele-heavy score — that never adds up to much of anything.

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  • Released: 2006
  • Rating: R
  • Review: Ostensibly a mystery about a missing woman, this thin, talky film is actually another unsatisfying exploration of masculine anomie written, directed by and starring Edward Burns. High-school baseball coach Abe Fiannico (David Krumholtz) is baffled by the d… (more)

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