Let's Go Native

  • 1930
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Musical

LET'S GO NATIVE is another variation of THE ADMIRABLE CRICHTON (which preceded it) and TV's "Gilligan's Island," which has so familiarized audiences with this situation that it should put a stop to this kind of picture forever. The difference is that LET'S GO NATIVE has some songs, and other films with the same theme are far funnier. Director McCarey couldn't...read more

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LET'S GO NATIVE is another variation of THE ADMIRABLE CRICHTON (which preceded it) and TV's "Gilligan's Island," which has so familiarized audiences with this situation that it should put a stop to this kind of picture forever. The difference is that LET'S GO NATIVE has some songs, and

other films with the same theme are far funnier. Director McCarey couldn't make the trite script work at all, and the picture didn't have much success, despite starring Oakie and MacDonald, two of the more popular stars of the day. Sellon is a millionaire who wants his son, Hall, to marry

MacDonald, a girl of his choosing. Hall rebels and hops a boat going to Argentina. He stokes alongside Oakie, a Brooklyn cab driver who had an accident and can't pay off, so he's departing the US Hall's fiancee, MacDonald, is on board as well, trying to raise money for a show she hopes to present

in Buenos Aires. The boat is wrecked and everyone winds up on a lush, tropical island. Gallagher, a dancer, was shipwrecked there sometime before and has taught the natives how to sing and dance. Once on the island, everyone has to wear the theatrical clothing that washed up on shore. MacDonald

buys the island from the natives by offering them the costumes for her show. (Does this sound like the Indians selling Manhattan for $24 in trinkets?). Sellon, who arrives with a rescue party as MacDonald and Hall are falling in love, buys the island from MacDonald (it's filled with oil and gems).

But just as the deal is completed, the island sinks as a result of an earthquake. Oakie and Francis have also fallen in love by this time and the picture ends. The idea of Hall and MacDonald, who at first want nothing to do with each other, being thrown together by fate and falling in love, is not

new. Matter of fact, very little of the picture is anything but old hat. The best line is spoken by Gallagher, who remarks "This was one of the Virgin Islands, before I got here." Tunes include: "I've Got a Yen for You," "Let's Go Native," "My Mad Moment," "It Seems To Be Spring," "Joe Jazz," and

a background music piece by Victor Schertzinger, "Gotta Be Good." Two other songs were written for the film but were either never shot or cut from the release print. They were "Pampa Rose" and "Don't I Do." Co-writer Marion had been a famous silent film title writer before this foray into sound

films, which did not enhance his career.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: LET'S GO NATIVE is another variation of THE ADMIRABLE CRICHTON (which preceded it) and TV's "Gilligan's Island," which has so familiarized audiences with this situation that it should put a stop to this kind of picture forever. The difference is that LET'S… (more)

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