King Lear

  • 1970
  • Movie
  • GP
  • Drama

Putting aside the question of whether Shakespeare's "King Lear" is adaptable, this film is a superbly acted, exceptionally photographed, emotional powerhouse. Scofield's performance as the king is gripping. He offers his kingdom to his three daughters, Worth, Engel, and Gabold. Worth and Engel deceive him with their affection, but Gabold refuses to take...read more

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Putting aside the question of whether Shakespeare's "King Lear" is adaptable, this film is a superbly acted, exceptionally photographed, emotional powerhouse. Scofield's performance as the king is gripping. He offers his kingdom to his three daughters, Worth, Engel, and Gabold. Worth and

Engel deceive him with their affection, but Gabold refuses to take part in their insincerity. She is promptly spurned by Scofield, but he soon realizes what has really transpired. A battle ensues between the two factions of the family, and, in the end, the daughters are all are killed, and

Scofield's heart gives way. Surprisingly, this is the first sound film version of KING LEAR, although a CBS-TV "Omnibus" version featured Orson Welles as Lear. Other versions include a 1909 one-reeler, a 1916 silent feature, and 1985's RAN, an epic undertaking by the 75-year-old Japanese director,

Akira Kurosawa.

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  • Rating: GP
  • Review: Putting aside the question of whether Shakespeare's "King Lear" is adaptable, this film is a superbly acted, exceptionally photographed, emotional powerhouse. Scofield's performance as the king is gripping. He offers his kingdom to his three daughters, Wor… (more)

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