James Joyce's Women

  • 1985
  • Movie
  • R
  • Drama

Fionnula Flanagan dons just about every hat in this audacious attempt at bringing James Joyce's essence to the screen. She is the star, adapter, producer, and executive producer. Flanagan's performance, in which she essays all the major female roles, is nothing short of amazing, as she holds our interest while helping the film transcend the obvious limitations....read more

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Fionnula Flanagan dons just about every hat in this audacious attempt at bringing James Joyce's essence to the screen. She is the star, adapter, producer, and executive producer. Flanagan's performance, in which she essays all the major female roles, is nothing short of amazing, as she

holds our interest while helping the film transcend the obvious limitations. The movie's framework is an interview with Nora Joyce (Flanagan) one month before her death in 1951 in Zurich. His wife was the inspiration for many of Joyce's women characters. Nora talks of their poverty, the spats, and

their loving correspondence over the years, which reveals some of the more intimate details of their lives. The other characters she plays during the course of the film are Gertie MacDowell, the young woman who sees a stranger on the beach and fantasizes erotically and comedically; Molly Bloom,

whose stream-of-consciousness monolog ends the novel; Sylvia Beach, the American woman whose bookstore published Ulysses and stirred the controversy; Harriet Shaw Weaver, Joyce's editor of Finnegan's Wake; and Anna Livia Plurabelle, the washerwoman in the aforementioned book. This ambitious

picture transfers Joyce to the screen most effectively. Rather than biting off an entire story, this presents bits and pieces that, when added together, are more telling than any single one of Joyce's works. Though others in the film do well, it is Flanagan's movie from start to finish.

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  • Released: 1985
  • Rating: R
  • Review: Fionnula Flanagan dons just about every hat in this audacious attempt at bringing James Joyce's essence to the screen. She is the star, adapter, producer, and executive producer. Flanagan's performance, in which she essays all the major female roles, is no… (more)

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