In Gold We Trust

  • 1992
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Action, Martial Arts

This film features enough warring factions to keep UN delegates busy around the clock for the next decade. Set somewhere along the Thai-Cambodian border, IN GOLD WE TRUST requires a good memory to sort out who's on whose side. Once again Vietnam's ghost haunts an action flick as a Ross Perot-type heads a rescue mission to free MIAs with gold. Embittered...read more

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This film features enough warring factions to keep UN delegates busy around the clock for the next decade. Set somewhere along the Thai-Cambodian border, IN GOLD WE TRUST requires a good memory to sort out who's on whose side. Once again Vietnam's ghost haunts an action flick as a Ross

Perot-type heads a rescue mission to free MIAs with gold.

Embittered at being forgotten by their country for so long, the renegade POWs led by the deranged Jeff Slater (Sam J. Jones) intercept the ransom intended to free them. After obtaining the booty contained in an all-but-impenetrable container, they foolishly kill the man with the combination and

spend much of the film's running time figuring out how to unlock or blow open the safe. While they search for a hiding place from rebel forces and the local military, the US government dispatches noble Oliver Moss (Jan-Michael Vincent) and his associates to retrieve the dough and carry out the

mission--never realizing that their former comrades-in-arms, the Slater Bunch, have already nabbed their own ransom.

Encountering mountain guerrillas led by Moss's long-lost love Sal-Kam (Michi McGee), Moss enlists them in locating the missing treasure as well as Sal-Kam's sister who has been kidnapped by Slater and used as his love slave. Complicating matters is the participation of Sal-Kam's father in the

botched transfer of money-for-MIAs, but he ends up dead. Foolhardily, Slater has hidden the ransom container in a cave populated by Japanese troops apparently living there since WWII. Before the Rising Sun can rise again, Slater's right-hand man, Greg (James Phillips), pretends to be a loyal

Yankee and leads Moss's contingent and the rebels into a trap.

Temporarily forced to team up to retrieve the safe from the Japanese, Moss's fighters and Slater's renegade band attack their mutual enemy. In the climactic melee, Slater's Russian crony Christoph (Christoph Kluppel) cancels out the spirit of Glasnost with his machine gun; Sal-Kam's sister bites

the dust; the Japanese MIAs are all eliminated; Slater and his goons don't live to spend any of Uncle Sam's money, which goes to help the rebel cause; Moss's buddies return home; and Moss stays behind to help Sal-Kam raise a lot of little guerrillas.

No one views an action film to demand logic, but one does expect an exercise in military machismo to be less confusing. How, for example, have those Japanese soldiers existed in hiding--and for how many years? They dance around as if they've been waiting for Mothra to save them. With so many

brands of guerrillas, and Cambodian forces, and turncoat Americans, was it necessary to write the forgotten Japanese into the screenplay? Is the film saying that all nations abandon their fighting men when expedient? If so, they left out a few countries. Even without the Japanese, IN GOLD WE TRUST

is already populated with too many double-crosses and betrayals. Maybe it doesn't matter how many brands of bad guy there are, since we can recognize Jan-Michael Vincent's crew as the heroes. Tellingly, the film offers a rare opportunity to hiss MIAs as villains.

Putting confusion aside, action fans can enjoy martial arts demonstrations in the cavernous cave, muscular mano a mano combat, colorful explosions, and the profane banter of traitorous Americans enterprising enough to cut out the middle man and steal their own ransom. Hobbled with a tortuous

script, IN GOLD WE TRUST musters up some vigorous, hard-edged action for the non-discriminating. (Violence, profanity, some nudity.)

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  • Released: 1992
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: This film features enough warring factions to keep UN delegates busy around the clock for the next decade. Set somewhere along the Thai-Cambodian border, IN GOLD WE TRUST requires a good memory to sort out who's on whose side. Once again Vietnam's ghost ha… (more)

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