Matt Roush


Tuesday Review: Intelligence, Killer Women, Justified and a Ton of New TV

Meghan Ory, Josh Holloway and Marg Helgenberger

He's a hunkier Chuck with the mad fighting skills, reckless bravado — and propensity toward angst — of Alias's Sydney Bristow. Meet TV's new Six Billion Dollar Man, Gabriel Vaughn, who you'll recognize as Sawyer from Lost. And Josh Holloway is very much the main reason to tune into CBS's Intelligence (Tuesday, 9/8c), a proficient if initially perfunctory action thriller that benefits immeasurably from its star's gruff, bluff machismo. Although a little less brooding (over a long-missing wife who might be a terrorist) would make Gabriel, and Intelligence, a lot more fun.

read more

Ask Matt: Deaths on Homeland and Sons, the Globes, Nikita, Doctor Who

Homeland

Question: [RETROACTIVE SPOILER ALERT FOR THOSE NOT KEEPING UP] I'm watching Homeland and Sons of Anarchy more out of habit than passion these days, after what I thought were disappointing seasons for both. But even so, I was startled when their seasons ended on such grim notes in December, with the violent deaths of major characters. Which surprised you more: Brody's execution as Carrie bore witness on Homeland or Tara's brutal murder at Gemma's hands on Sons? Or did you see each of these events as inevitable? On the same note, which show do you think is better positioned to bounce back from these game-changers, or did they maybe (and I know you hate the expression) jump the shark? — Cass

read more

Monday Review: Return of Teen Wolf, Hostages Finale, Private Time With TCM's Host

Teen Wolf

Nightmares within dreams within waking nightmares — life is just a howl in the viscerally creepy world of MTV's Teen Wolf. Recently voted "Fan Favorite" by TV Guide Magazine readers (and rewarded a December cover), this unexpectedly enjoyable monster mash is back to finish an extended third season (Monday, 10/9c) with its main characters deep in the thrall of post-traumatic stress, supernatural variety.

read more

Weekend Review: Downton Abbey, Dateline on Asthma, Best of Fallon, All-Star Simpsons

Downton Abbey

Was it really so hard finding good help in those days? When Robert, aka Lord Grantham (Hugh Bonneville), is informed that his wife is once again bereft of a lady's maid, he overdramatically moans, "Are we living under a curse?"

There's no question a pall thicker than London fog hangs heavy over Downton Abbey in its fourth year as Masterpiece Classic's signature series (Sunday, 9/8c, on PBS; check tvguide.com listings). Not only has Lady Cora's bedchamber not been the same since her scheming servant O'Brien left — she slinks away in the opening scene, and boy, is she missed — but the family and staff are in sustained mourning over the untimely (and contrived) death, six months earlier, of heir Matthew Crawley, Lady Mary's husband, in last year's unhappy finale.

read more

Thursday TV Review: Community Returns, ABC's Assets

Paul Rhys

Happy New TV Year! With the Winter Olympics only a little more than a month away, the networks are wasting no time premiering new and returning shows through January, making this almost as busy a month for programming as the heights of September. Let the winter midseason begin.

BACK TO SCHOOL: Some underdogs adopt a never-say-die mentality. In the fringe world of wackiness known as NBC's Community, it's more like never say graduate, as the cult comedy returns for an against-the-odds fifth season with back-to-back episodes (Thursday, 8/7c) once again under the warped tutelage of mercurial series creator Dan Harmon. (For more on his and the show's comeback, go here.)

read more

Matt Roush's Top 10 of 2013

Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul

1. Breaking Bad
What a way to go out — with a bang, on a tragic yet triumphant high, at the peak of popularity and notoriety. What could be more satisfying than that? There wasn't a wasted moment or unexplored opportunity for suspenseful conflict in the intense last chapters of AMC's masterful thriller, charting Walter White's ultimate descent into criminal infamy. Bryan Cranston brilliantly captured the character's mood swings, from wounded pride to murderous rage to sorrow over the family he lost due to his dark machinations. No maddening ambiguities in this grand finale... read more

Ask Matt: The Scandal Hiatus, Carrie Preston and Good Wife, Sound of Music, Following

Scandal

Send questions and comments to askmatt@tvguidemagazine.com and follow me on Twitter!

Question: Announcing a plan to take their top dramas off the air to avoid reruns is one thing, but how do you think ABC is actually going to fare for the next couple of months while Grey's Anatomy, Scandal, Once Upon a Time and Revenge take two-month breathers? I am a fan of the airing-consecutively strategy, but I'm afraid they won't stick to this model, because quite frankly, the new shows they are using as substitutes in these timeslots don't look very good. What happens if something bombs? Will they have no choice but to rush these signature shows back to the air sooner?

read more

Ask Matt: Race on Sleepy Hollow, Person of Interest, plus Grey's, Glee, Good Wife

Nicole Beharie

Send questions and comments to askmatt@tvguidemagazine.com and follow me on Twitter!

Question: What are your thoughts on the awareness of people in the TV industry regarding the perception that it's always the non-white characters that are killed off shows? It seems impossible to me that those in charge don't see this phenomenon as a problem, and yet, consistently, that seems to be what happens. That reality is so pervasive for me that when I watched the pilot for Sleepy Hollow, my thought as what looked to be the two main characters — a well-known white, male actor (Clancy Brown) and a young, unknown-to-me African-American actress (Nicole Beharie) — approached the spooky, abandoned farm house was, "Seriously, Show? Already you're going to kill off the black actor?" read more

Monday Review: Six by Sondheim

America Ferrera, James Lapine

Few love words as passionately as Broadway's master composer-lyricist Stephen Sondheim, but there's one word that makes him cringe: "Hummable," a quality some (erroneously) find lacking in his challenging, rewarding scores. "Drives me up the wall," he growls.

Which is why it's such an ironic delight when Sondheim performs as part of a new staging of his autobiographical "Opening Doors" production number (from the initially flop musical Merrily We Roll Along), playing a producer who bullies a team of young songwriters to conjure a "humm-umm-able melody."

read more

Review: NBC's Live The Sound of Music

Sound of Music Live

When The Sound of Music sang, it soared. And scored, attracting an astounding 18.5 million viewers Thursday during NBC's ambitious three-hour live broadcast of the enduring Rodgers & Hammerstein classic. Climb every ratings mountain, indeed.

With stunning sets and backdrops, generally gorgeous and enjoyable singing — Those nuns! Those kids! — and fluid direction that attempted to minimize the vacuum effect of people performing to an otherwise empty and hollow-sounding soundstage, this was a pleasurable one-night-only stunt that felt like a major TV event. Trust me, there will be more where this came from. (Let's start casting The King and I now.)

read more

My Watchlist

On TV

Editors' Picks

9:00PM | CBS
10:00PM | NBC
9:00PM | NBC

Full Episodes

Find a TV Show

See more »

TV GUIDE Users' Most Popular