Chris Eyre

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VIDEO: We Shall Remain: Trail of Tears

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We Shall Remain: Trail of Tears
Paid | iTunes
Length: 14:20:00
Aired: 4/27/2009

The Cherokee would call it Nu-No-Du-Na-Tlo-Hi-Lu, "The Trail Where They Cried." On May 26, 1838, federal troops forced thousands of Cherokee from their homes in the Southeastern United States, driving them toward Indian Territory in Eastern Oklahoma. More than 4,000 died of disease and starvation along the way. For years the Cherokee had resisted removal from their land in every way they knew. Convinced that white America rejected Native Americans because they were "savages," Cherokee leaders established a republic with a European-style legislature and legal system. Many Cherokee became Christian and adopted westernized education for their children. Their visionary principal chief, John Ross, would even take the Cherokee case to the Supreme Court, where he won a crucial recognition of tribal sovereignty that still resonates. Though in the end the Cherokee embrace of "civilization" and their landmark legal victory proved no match for white land hunger and military power, the Cherokee people were able, with characteristic ingenuity, to build a new life in Oklahoma, far from the land that had sustained them for generations. This is the third of a 5-part American Experience mini-series. watch

VIDEO: We Shall Remain: Trail of Tears

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We Shall Remain: Trail of Tears
Free | Xfinity
Length: 01:14:37
Aired: 4/27/2009

Though the Cherokee embraced “civilization” and won recognition of tribal sovereignty in the U.S. Supreme Court, their resistance to removal from their homeland failed. Thousands were forced on a perilous march to Oklahoma. watch

VIDEO: We Shall Remain: Tecumseh's Vision

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We Shall Remain: Tecumseh's Vision
Paid | iTunes
Length: 04:49:50
Aired: 4/20/2009

In the spring of 1805, Tenskwatawa, a Shawnee, fell into a trance so deep that those around him believed he had died. When he finally stirred, the young prophet claimed to have met the Master of Life. He told those who crowded around to listen that the Indians were in dire straits because they had adopted white culture and rejected traditional spiritual ways. For several years Tenskwatawa's spiritual revival movement drew thousands of adherents from tribes across the Midwest. His elder brother, Tecumseh, would harness the energies of that renewal to create an unprecedented military and political confederacy of often antagonistic tribes, all committed to stopping white westward expansion. The brothers came closer than anyone since to creating an Indian nation that would exist alongside and separate from the United States. The dream of an independent Indian state may have died at the Battle of the Thames, when Tecumseh was killed fighting alongside his British allies, but the great Shawnee warrior would live on as a potent symbol of Native pride and pan-Indian identity. This is the second of a 5-part American Experience mini-series. watch

Videos

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Edge of America - Interview with Chris Eyre and James McDaniel – Video Clip | Spike
Is Johnny Depp's Portrayal of Lone Ranger's Tonto Racist?
Smoke Signals - (Original Trailer)

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Skins (2002)
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Skins
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Skins
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Smoke Signals

More Chris Eyre Movies Videos

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The Edge of Florida
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We Shall Remain: Trail of Tears
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We Shall Remain: Tecumseh's Vision
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We Shall Remain: After the Mayflower

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Credits

Year Title Description
2002 Skins Movie, Co-Producer
2002 Skins Movie, Director
2002 Skins Movie, Actor - Cop
2001 The Doe Boy Movie, Producer
1998 Smoke Signals Movie, Director

More Credits (15)

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