Barbara Walters

20/20
10/9c ABC
The last time Barbara Walters sat down with President Obama was in July, on The View. Tonight's get-together (the interview was taped Tuesday) is on Obama's turf, the White House. Walters also interviewed Obama in November 2008, just after he was elected, and they talked at some length about the precarious state of the economy then. It's a bit stronger now, but he's a bit weaker politically, and the Democrats' midterm "shellacking" is likely to be Topic A. And First Lady Michelle Obama's also taking part in the session, so expect insight into how the First Family is dealing with the state of things, personally. — Paul Droesch

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Seinfeld

11 a.m./10c TBS
TBS serves up some post-Thanksgiving Day comedic trimmings featuring 18 successive episodes of Jerry Seinfeld's landmark "show about nothing" (which, in reality, was about so much). The marathon is bookended by two classics, opening with the "The Contest," a cleverly executed episode that goes down in sitcom lore by introducing the phrase "master of your domain" to America. Here, George, Jerry, Kramer and Elaine try to outwit, outplay and outlast one another to see who can avoid...umm...solo satisfaction. The block closes with "The Strike," a holiday twist in which George's dad invents his own winter holiday and hopes to have a merry little Festivus (for the rest of us). — Dean Maurer

College Football
3:30/2:30c ABC
You've heard the current situation in Washington, D.C., described as a lame-duck period — the way it often is, is every two years. Much the same can be said regarding the Big 12's status with Nebraska and Colorado. This is the last time these teams will meet as Big 12 rivals, as Nebraska — oddly enough — becomes the 12th member of the Big Ten, and Colorado bolts for the Pac-10. After escaping Boulder with a 28-20 win last season, in which they needed TD returns on a punt and an interception, the Huskers, who host Colorado today, lead the all-time series, 48-18-2. — Brendan Curley

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TV's Funniest Holiday Moments: A Paley Center for Media Special
8/7c Fox
Jane Lynch may portray a Grinch-like character on Glee, but tonight she spreads holiday cheer as she counts down 30 humorous holiday TV moments. Clips run the gamut from shows new and old, including The Big Bang Theory, Two and a Half Men, Friends and I Love Lucy. And speaking of the Grinch, he's in there too, as scenes from How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and A Charlie Brown Christmas, made the cut. — Jennifer Sankowski

Victorious
8/7c Nickelodeon
Jade and Cat think that a club called Karaoke Dokie is the perfect place to put their singing skills on display, so they enter a weekly competition there. And they lose... because the contest is rigged for the club owner's daughter to win. The girls are then dead set on revenge, and they rope Tori in to helping them expose the fixed contest. This hour-long episode features two new songs: Victoria Justice singing "Freak the Freak Out" and Elizabeth Gillies and Ariana Grande singing "Give It Up." — Jennifer Sankowski

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What Not to Wear: Best Mommy Makeovers
9/8c TLC
Over the years, Stacy London and Clinton Kelly have helped dozens of devoted moms who were guilty of crimes of fashion, from rocking the dreaded "mom jeans" to trying to dress like they're in their teens. In this special installment, the hosts look back at five of the most memorable mothers who appeared on their show, and their special stories that brought them there. — Karen Kelty

Rock Docs
9/8c VH1
Martin Scorsese directed this Rolling Stones concert film, shot in 2006 at the Beacon Theatre in New York. The headliners weren't the only celebrities in the house for the show. It may be only rock-and-roll, but former President Bill Clinton, his wife Hilary and Bruce Willis were among those who liked it, liked it, yes they did. Chances are that fans of the Stones will be pretty happy, too, as Scorsese caught the enduring rockers in fine, fine form in this edited version of the feature film. — Fred Mitchell