Sigourney Weaver, Eli Stone

What's the best way to create interest in a sophomore show like Eli Stone, which bounced from the bubble to a surprise second season? Stunt casting, of course! Sigourney Weaver plays Eli's therapist in the Oct. 14 season opener, and she's just one of several stars scheduled to pop us this year. (Others include Katie Holmes and singer Seal.) We chatted with Weaver about what drew her to this little show that could, whether we might see more of her character this season and what it would take to get her on the small screen in her own show. — Dana Meltzer Zepeda


TV Guide: What made you want to do the show?
Sigourney Weaver:
I didn't know the show, but they sent me a couple of [episodes], and I just felt it was very original, funny and beautifully shot. The idea that they would be so bold as to create a show about faith was very exciting.

TV Guide: You play Eli's therapist. Have you had much experience on the psychology front?
Weaver:
I actually have a therapist. She's very smart and we try not to talk about politics because we're both incensed about Sarah Palin… It's grounding to have a sounding board to discuss the issues in my life that I don't expect my husband [director Jim Simpson] or friends to be interested in.

TV Guide: Rumor has it that there's a big twist in the episode. Any hints?
Weaver:
Without giving away the secret, I can say that Eli goes where he usually meets me and [learns that] no one's been there for three months. He thinks he's imagined the whole thing.

TV Guide: Does that leave the door open for your return?
Weaver:
Well, once you know who my character might be, it makes sense that she may periodically pop up. We'll see.

TV Guide: Would you ever do your own TV series?
Weaver:
I would consider a half-hour comedy with a wonderful ensemble. If I were lucky enough to be offered one, what could be more fun in the world?

TV Guide: Does spirituality play a big role in your life?
Weaver:
I'm not big on organized religion, but I wanted to convert to Judaism for a while. I went and lived on a kibbutz in Israel, but it was so lame because it was very conservative and all the women worked in the kitchen. It wasn't a bunch of us out in the fields picking oranges and singing the way I had hoped, you know?