The Fosters

Jenny from the Block has a new address. Jennifer Lopez is one of the executive producers of The Fosters, a new drama about two moms (Teri Polo and Sherri Saum) with a multi-ethnic mix of biological, adopted and foster kids. Fellow exec producers and the show's creators, Peter Paige and Bradley Bredeweg (Queer as Folk), explain why we should take in The Fosters, which premieres Monday at 9/8c on ABC Family.

TV Guide Magazine: I have time to watch one more show. Why should it be yours?
Peter Paige: Because it's the first show ever of its kind. Because there's nothing else like it currently on television. Because it's a traditional family drama about the most non-traditional family you could find. Because it's an extraordinary group of people to get to spend time with every week — smart, funny, messy, kind — you know, like you and the people you love.

TV Guide Magazine: Who should be watching?
Bradley Bredeweg: Anyone who likes to be moved by their TV viewing. We're going to take you on a great ride every week — through emotional drama, sweet humor, a little mystery and intrigue, and some delicious romance... Everyone enjoys that, right?

TV Guide Magazine: What happens if we don't watch your show?
Paige: The terrorists win.

TV Guide Magazine: What's the best thing anyone has said or written about The Fosters?
Bredeweg: A common theme that seems to be emerging is that everyone recognizes him or herself somewhere in the fabric of the show. We keep hearing, "I was totally that kid," or "That's exactly how my mom would've handled that," or "That's my story." We love that.

TV Guide Magazine: What's the worst thing?
Paige: One writer we met with said it reminded him of a surreal telenovela. And since our show is neither surreal, nor a daily soap — well, suffice it to say he didn't get the job.

TV Guide Magazine: Who was right?
Bredeweg: Oh, he was, totally. By episode two we have dancing monkeys and melting clocks, so I guess he knew more than we did. I'm kidding, of course. We were, 100 percent.

TV Guide Magazine: What's an alternate title for your show?
Paige: We probably pitched like a thousand other titles, not one of which worked. So ... um... That Show About Those Cool Lesbian Moms With All Those Awesome Kids? Or maybe (with all due respect to Paul Reiser and Greg Evigan) My Two Moms?

TV Guide Magazine: Finish this sentence: "If you like _______, you'll love our show."
Paige: People? I guess if you're a total misanthrope, we're probably not the show for you. But other than that, everyone should be able to find someone or something to relate to.

TV Guide Magazine: Tell me one thing about your cast.
Paige: From the first table read, they have felt like this beautiful family. It's crazy. The vibe on set is so special. We're very lucky to have them.

TV Guide Magazine: Come up with a premise for the spin-off.
Paige: Are you kidding? We've got kids ripe for college, adopted, foster, and birth families, not to mention boyfriends and girlfriends galore. We're gonna launch a whole network entirely programmed with spin-offs!

TV Guide Magazine: What credit of yours would you prefer we forget?
Bredeweg: Wait. You want us to remind you about the terrible reality show we created about flight attendants [Fly Girls]? No way. Mum's the word.

TV Guide Magazine: Let's scare the network. Tell us an idea that didn't make it to the screen.
Bredeweg: ABC Family is the bravest network out there. They're the ones pushing us. Fearless, I tell you, fearless!

TV Guide Magazine: Pick another show and start a fake feud.
Paige: One of my best friends is an EP on Modern Family, and I just think their portrayal of gay men in a loving, monogamous relationship raising children is reprehensible. Everyone knows only lesbians are monogamous.

TV Guide Magazine: With what show would you like to do a crossover episode?
Bredeweg: Well, we don't want to do this now, but if any of the cast gets a big head we're gonna send them over to AMC's The Walking Dead and have them get eaten.

TV Guide Magazine: How will your show change the face of TV as we know it?
Paige: I'm sure this question was meant as a joke, but having been a part of Queer as Folk, I've seen the power of TV to change social attitudes first hand. And we would love it if, when this generation of teenagers goes off to college and they meet someone who was raised in a non-traditional family — two moms, two dads, adopted, fostered, whatever it is — that it potentially will be a total non-issue for them, the most normal thing in the world. Because the truth is, there are so many different kinds of families out there, and they're all deserving of respect. It's a lofty goal for a cable TV show, but it sure makes it easy to get out of bed in the morning.

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