Ann Hornaday (inset), Judd Apatow, Seth Rogen

Washington Post writer says she understands why her article about Santa Barbara killer Elliot Rodger offended and upset Seth Rogen and Judd Apatow.

Over the weekend, Ann Hornaday published a piece about the horrific YouTube manifesto Rodger uploaded prior to murdering six people. In the article, Hornaday spoke about Rodger's privileged lifestyle and Hollywood before calling out Rogen's latest film, Neighbors. "[Rodgers] unwittingly expressed the toxic double helix of insecurity and entitlement that comprises Hollywood's DNA," she wrote. "How many students watch outsized frat-boy fantasies likeNeighbors and feel, as Rodger did, unjustly shut out of college life that should be full of 'sex and fun and pleasure'? How many men, raised on a steady diet of Judd Apatow comedies in which the shlubby arrested adolescent always gets the girl, find that those happy endings constantly elude them and conclude, 'It's not fair'?"

TV stars at the movies

When both Rogen and Apatow learned of the article they were infuriated. On Tuesday, Rogen tweeted:

Apatow also expressed his anger on Twitter:

On Tuesday, Hornday followed up with another article, explaining that she understood the criticism. "As un-fun as it is to be slammed by famous people, I could understand Apatow and Rogen's dismay," she wrote. "Why would a movie reviewer even weigh in on the Isla Vista tragedy in the first place? ... Movies aren't accurate reflections of real life, as I wrote in the essay. But there's no doubt they powerfully condition what we desire and feel we deserve from it. I was not using the grievous episode in Isla Vista to make myself more famous; nor was I casting blame on the movies for Rodger's actions. Rather, in my capacity as a movie critic, I was looking at the video as a lens through which to examine questions about sexism, insecurity and entitlement, how they've threaded their way through an entertainment culture historically dominated by men and how they've shaped our own expectations as individuals and a culture."

What do you think of the debate?