Pat Summerall

Longtime NFL broadcaster Pat Summerall died Tuesday, the Dallas Morning News reports. He was 82.

Summerall died in his hospital room at Texas' Zale Lipshy Hospital where he was recovering from surgery for a broken hip, a family friend confirmed to the newspaper.

A Florida native, Summerall played football, basketball and baseball at the University of Arkansas before playing first base for the St. Louis Cardinals' Class C team. He then moved to the NFL in 1952 and went on to play for the Detroit Lions, the Chicago Cardinals and the New York Giants before retiring in 1961.  

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Summerall started announcing games for WCBS radio in New York and joined CBS in 1962  as a part-time analyst. He worked alongside veteran announcer Tom Brookshier before teaming up with John Madden for 21 seasons. Summerall and Madden became the most popular sports broadcast team in the country and their work during Super Bowl XVI in 1982 is still the highest-rated sports program ever. Summerall worked on a record 16 Super Bowls throughout his career.

Known for his minimalist style, Summerall also called NBA games for CBS, and was the network's lead voice on golf and tennis events, including 27 Masters and 20 United States Tennis Opens.  In 1994, he followed Madden to Fox when the network outbid CBS for NFL programming rights. He broadcast his last Super Bowl in 2002 and retired soon after. However, he called several early 2004 NFL season games for ESPN and also worked on the 2007 and 2008 Cotton Bowls for Fox.

Off the field, Summerall struggled with alcoholism but remained sober after he spent five weeks at the Betty Ford Center in 1992. Two years later, he convinced baseball legend Mickey Mantle to do the same and 10 years after that, Summerall received a liver transplant. In recent years, he had also undergone cataract surgery in 2006 and hip replacement surgery in 2008.