GQ

GQ's sexy Glee cover and photo spread has caused quite a stir, and not just with hormonal guys.

The racy photos, which were posted online Tuesday, feature actresses Lea Michele and Dianna Agron in tarted-up, come-hither vixen mode; in one shot, Michele, wearing a top and underwear, is seated on a bench facing the camera with her legs spread open.

On Wednesday, the Parents Television Council denounced the magazine and the creators of Glee, describing the spread as one that "borders on pedophilia." Agron, who plays Quinn on the show, posted her thoughts on her personal blog following the commotion. "Nobody is perfect, and these photos do not represent who I am," she wrote.

"For GQ, they asked us to play very heightened versions of our school characters. A 'Hit Me Baby One More Time' version. At the time, it wasn't my favorite idea, but I did not walk away."

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PTC President Tim Winter said in a statement: "It is disturbing that GQ, which is explicitly written for adult men, is sexualizing the actresses who play high school-aged characters on Glee in this way. Sadly, this is just the latest example of the overt sexualization of young girls in entertainment."

Winter said Glee's younger viewers who may have seen the magazine were "treated to seductive, in-your-face poses of the underwear-clad female characters posing in front of school lockers, one of them opting for a full-frontal crotch shot ... By authorizing this kind of near-pornographic display, the creators of the program have established their intentions on the show's direction. And it isn't good for families."

Though the three Glee actors in the photo shoot portray high schoolers, Michele and Agron are both 24, while Cory Monteith is 28.

Agron, who noted that her views on the matter are her own and not that of Fox or the series producers, said Glee is not the first show to push the envelope. "I understand that in today's world of advanced technology, the internet, our kids can be subject to very adult material at the click of a button," she wrote. "But there are parental locks, and ways to get around this."

"If you are hurt or these photos make you uncomfortable, it was never our intention. And if your eight-year-old has a copy of our GQ cover in hand, again I am sorry. But I would have to ask, how on earth did it get there?"

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GQ responded to the PTC's reaction with a statement of its own: "The Parents Television Council must not be watching much TV these days and should learn to divide reality from fantasy. As often happens in Hollywood, these 'kids' are in their twenties. Cory Montieth's almost 30! I think they're old enough to do what they want."

Reps for the Fox series declined to comment.