Damon Lindelof, Superman

Superman hit the big 900 on Wednesday. Action Comics, the signature title that launched the Man of Steel's career in 1938, released its 900th consecutive issue this week, the first comic to reach that milestone. To commemorate the event, publisher DC Comics recruited an all-star squadron of writers to contribute to the issue, including Richard Donner (director of Superman: The Movie) David Goyer (cowriter of Batman Begins), Paul Dini (writer/producer of Superman: The Animated Series) and Lost exec producer Damon Lindelof. Lindeolf's story, "Life Support," is set on Krypton in the days before the planet exploded, as scientist Jor-El is planning to send his son Kal-El (the future Superman) to Earth in a rocket ship. TV Guide Magazine emailed Lindelof, who previously wrote Marvel Comics' Ultimate Wolverine vs. Hulk, a few questions about this super assignment.

TV Guide Magazine: Was the idea for this story yours or DC's? If it was yours, why did you choose this particular story?
Lindelof: The idea was mine, but the guys at DC were very open to doing a Superman story without Superman. I can't really take credit for any personal spin as I steal almost all my ideas from Watchmen, but I wanted to do that cool Moore/Gibbons trick where you're cutting between two timelines, something we really loved doing on Lost.

TV Guide Magazine: What are your earliest memories of reading comic books? Which comics (if any) that you read as a kid do you still read today?
Lindelof: I'm ashamed to say I got started on Richie Rich, Hot Stuff and Archie as a kid... but by 7 or 8, I was all about the superhero books with heavy favoritism towards Batman. At 11, I got hooked on the Marvel Universe and never looked back.  And I am not ashamed to say that I frequent my local comic book store every Wednesday at lunchtime.

TV Guide Magazine: Will you be doing any other comic book writing in the near future?
Lindelof: No plans right now, but I'm open to it if the idea is cool.

TV Guide: Since this is about Superman, a Smallville question seems in order. Given your recent experience with a series finale of a long-running, beloved series, what advice would you give to Smallville showrunners Kelly Souders and Brian Peterson about how to handle the hours, days and weeks immediately following their finale, both in terms of fan reaction and moving on to the next chapter of your life/career?
Lindelof: I'm not really qualified to give advice to those guys as I'm in awe of what they've achieved over the last decade and I'm convinced they're going out on top. My one hope for them is that they'll be able to appreciate their incredible accomplishment.

Subscribe to TV Guide Magazine now!